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image: Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

By | April 21, 2016

Housing laboratory mice with those reared in a pet store makes the lab rodents’ immune systems more similar to those of people.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

Mutations Not Tied to Metastasis

By | February 25, 2016

Clinical cases link immune changes to a cancer’s spread through the body, but find no role for so-called “driver” mutations.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Infection-Autism Link Explained?

Infection-Autism Link Explained?

By | January 31, 2016

A mouse study suggests a mechanism by which severe infections during pregnancy increase autism risk. 

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image: When the Flu Vax Fails

When the Flu Vax Fails

By | December 16, 2015

The status of a person’s immune system can predict when a seasonal flu vaccination will not provide sufficient protection, according to a study. 

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image: Long-Lived Immune Memories

Long-Lived Immune Memories

By | December 9, 2015

Two types of memory T cells can preserve immunological memories for more than a decade, a study shows. 

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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