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image: Details Published on CRISPR-treated Embryos

Details Published on CRISPR-treated Embryos

By | August 2, 2017

Scientists correct a mutation in fertilized eggs that causes a severe cardiac disease.

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A cardiovascular surgeon’s research was rejected for publication because it referenced evolutionary theory, Turkish outlets report, while the university at the center of the tumult claims the story is false. 

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Injecting photosynthetic microbes into oxygen-starved heart tissue can improve cardiac function in rodents. 

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image: Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells

Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells

By | June 1, 2016

Researchers derive cardiac precursors to form cardiac muscle, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells in mice.

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image: The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

By | June 1, 2016

In failing hearts, cardiomyocytes change their fuel preference.

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image: In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

By | June 1, 2016

While the heart cells normally burn fatty acids, when things go wrong ketones become the preferred fuel source.

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image: ORI: Researcher Faked Dozens of Experiments

ORI: Researcher Faked Dozens of Experiments

By | May 25, 2016

A former scientist at the University of Michigan and the University of Chicago made up more than 70 experiments on heart cells, according to the Office of Research Integrity.

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image: Hearts in Hand

Hearts in Hand

By | January 1, 2016

Texas Heart Institute heart surgeon Bud Frazier is a pioneer of heart transplant technologies.

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image: If It Ain't Broke . . .

If It Ain't Broke . . .

By | January 1, 2016

Is there room to improve upon the tried-and-true, decades-old technology of artificial hearts?

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image: Smooth Move

Smooth Move

By | January 1, 2016

In the mouse lung, hardening of a blood vessel can result from just a single progenitor cell forming new smooth muscle.

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