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image: Phages Carry Antibiotic Resistance Genes

Phages Carry Antibiotic Resistance Genes

By | December 8, 2016

Researchers find evidence of antibiotic resistance genes in the DNA of viruses that infect bacteria.

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image: Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease

Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease

By | December 1, 2016

Bacteria in the intestine influence motor dysfunction and neuroinflammation in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease.

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A family’s collection of antique microscope slides became a trove of genetic information about the eradicated European malaria pathogen.

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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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A new literature review finds that even if babies born via Cesarean section have long-term health risks, as a number of past studies purport, it may not be a result of the procedure itself.

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Obesity-associated microbiome composition can persist after weight loss, affecting the exchange of metabolites between a mouse and its resident bugs, researchers report.

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image: Zika-Associated Microcephaly Can Present After Birth

Zika-Associated Microcephaly Can Present After Birth

By | November 23, 2016

Researchers report on more than a dozen cases in which babies who showed signs of in-utero infection but were born without symptoms of congenital Zika syndrome went on to develop brain abnormalities. 

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image: Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

By | November 18, 2016

E. coli cultured on the International Space Station show increased expression of genes related to starvation and acid-resistance responses, researchers report.

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New evidence suggests both viruses can cohabitate in a single mosquito.

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image: Antibody Treatment Lessens Zika’s Effects in Mice

Antibody Treatment Lessens Zika’s Effects in Mice

By | November 7, 2016

When given to pregnant rodents, a human antibody against a viral envelope protein reduces fetal infection, scientists show.

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