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image: Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

By | June 1, 2016

Lacing insect food with microbes encoding double-stranded RNAs can suppress insect gene expression.

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image: Pioneering Memory Researcher Dies

Pioneering Memory Researcher Dies

By | May 31, 2016

Suzanne Corkin, who studied the famous patient “H.M.,” has passed away at 79.

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A Congressional investigation indicates that the National Football League may have sought to steer millions of dollars in National Institutes of Health funding away from one of its critics.

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image: CDC: Screen Pee for Zika, Too

CDC: Screen Pee for Zika, Too

By | May 11, 2016

Health officials say testing urine as well as blood samples can provide a more accurate diagnosis than screening blood alone.

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image: Zika Causes Microcephaly in Mice

Zika Causes Microcephaly in Mice

By | May 11, 2016

Three studies show that the virus can cause birth defects in mouse embryos.

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image: Sea Star Comeback?

Sea Star Comeback?

By | May 9, 2016

Hordes of baby sea stars on the Pacific coast survived the summer and winter of 2015—promising news about populations that have been devastated by a wasting disease.

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image: Tasmanian Devil Antibodies Fight Cancer

Tasmanian Devil Antibodies Fight Cancer

By | May 9, 2016

The proteins could be the key to stopping the transmissible facial tumor disease that is threatening the species.

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image: TS Picks: May 5, 2016

TS Picks: May 5, 2016

By | May 5, 2016

Zika update edition

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: Transparency Now

Transparency Now

By | May 1, 2016

Science is messy. So lay it out, warts and all.

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