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image: Texas Considers GM Mosquitoes

Texas Considers GM Mosquitoes

By | March 28, 2017

In an effort to prevent the spread of Zika virus, Harris County officials are in discussions with Oxitec to release insects engineered to produce short-lived offspring.

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The pathogenic fungus that has decimated populations of bats throughout the eastern United States has surfaced in the state for the first time, although none of the bats appear diseased.

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image: Pathway to Polio Virulence Revealed

Pathway to Polio Virulence Revealed

By | March 23, 2017

Using epidemiological and laboratory data, scientists have mapped out a sequence of mutations through which the attenuated oral polio vaccine reverts to a virulent virus.

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image: Famed Statistician and Data Visualizer Dies

Famed Statistician and Data Visualizer Dies

By | February 8, 2017

Hans Rosling of the Karolinska Institute has passed away at age 68.

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image: Unique Antibodies Open Path Toward New HIV Vaccines

Unique Antibodies Open Path Toward New HIV Vaccines

By | January 27, 2017

A family of broadly neutralizing antibodies from a chronically infected donor provides a schematic for designing vaccines and treatments that target multiple strains of the virus.

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image: Toward Breaking the Cold Chain

Toward Breaking the Cold Chain

By | January 24, 2017

Research efforts aim to obviate the need for vaccine refrigeration.

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image: Bacteria-Treated Mosquitoes Released in More Locations

Bacteria-Treated Mosquitoes Released in More Locations

By | January 17, 2017

Infected with Wolbachia, the insects are expected to reduce the spread of dengue and Zika. But scientists say the approach may have limitations.

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image: First Bumblebee Species Declared Endangered in U.S.

First Bumblebee Species Declared Endangered in U.S.

By | January 11, 2017

The federal government concludes the rusty patched bumblebee is nearing extinction.

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A case study reports evidence of viral replication lingering in the respiratory tract of an infected person, even after the person’s blood was Ebola free.

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image: The Sled Dogs that Stopped an Outbreak

The Sled Dogs that Stopped an Outbreak

By | January 1, 2017

Balto, Togo, and other huskies famously delivered life-saving serum to a remote Alaskan town in 1925—but newspapers didn’t tell the whole story. 

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