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New evidence suggests both viruses can cohabitate in a single mosquito.

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image: Antibody Treatment Lessens Zika’s Effects in Mice

Antibody Treatment Lessens Zika’s Effects in Mice

By | November 7, 2016

When given to pregnant rodents, a human antibody against a viral envelope protein reduces fetal infection, scientists show.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Nosing Around

Nosing Around

By | November 1, 2016

Covering neuroscience research means choosing from an embarrassment of riches.

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image: Viruses of the Human Body

Viruses of the Human Body

By | November 1, 2016

Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.

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image: Immune System Maintains Brain Health

Immune System Maintains Brain Health

By | November 1, 2016

Once thought only to attack neurons, immune cells turn out to be vital for central nervous system function.

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image: Immunity in the Brain

Immunity in the Brain

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers document the diverse roles of immune cells in neuronal health and disease.

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image: Week in Review: October 24–28

Week in Review: October 24–28

By | October 27, 2016

Patient Zero exonerated; Jack Woodall dies; Wolbachia-harboring mosquitoes deployed in fight against Zika; implanted neurons function in adult mouse brain 

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image: Public Health Leader Dies

Public Health Leader Dies

By | October 26, 2016

Jack Woodall, an epidemiologist and former columnist at The Scientist, cofounded the infectious disease outbreak reporting system ProMED. 

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image: Fighting Zika with Bacteria-Laden Mosquitos

Fighting Zika with Bacteria-Laden Mosquitos

By | October 26, 2016

Scientists in South America are testing the strategy of infecting mosquitos with Wolbachia, an approach intended to reduce Zika transmission.

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