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» infectious disease, culture and microbiology

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Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2015

The Genealogy of a Gene, On the Move, The Chimp and the River, and Domesticated

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Contributors

By | May 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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Hidden Menace

By , , and | May 1, 2015

Curing HIV means finding and eradicating viruses still lurking in the shadows.

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image: Hiding in the Haystack

Hiding in the Haystack

By | May 1, 2015

Encouraging developments in HIV research

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image: HIV in the Internet Age

HIV in the Internet Age

By | May 1, 2015

Social networking sites may facilitate the spread of sexually transmitted disease, but these sites also serve as effective education and prevention tools.

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image: Llamas as Lab Rats

Llamas as Lab Rats

By | May 1, 2015

From diagnostics to vaccines, llama antibodies point to new directions in HIV research.

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Miraculous Activist

By | May 1, 2015

Timothy Ray Brown, commonly referred to as the “Berlin patient,” does not want to be the only person cured of AIDS.

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Putting It Together

By | May 1, 2015

Exploring viral replication pathways has led Carol Carter from the study of measles and reoviruses to the assembly and budding of newly minted HIV.

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image: Scanning for SIV’s Sanctuaries

Scanning for SIV’s Sanctuaries

By | May 1, 2015

Whole-body immunoPET scans of SIV-infected macaques reveal where the replicating virus hides.  

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image: Show Me Your Moves

Show Me Your Moves

By | May 1, 2015

Updated classics and new techniques help microbiologists get up close and quantitative.

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