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image: Dozens of Researchers Exposed to Anthrax

Dozens of Researchers Exposed to Anthrax

By | June 22, 2014

As many as 75 scientists at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention may have come in contact with live Bacillus anthracis, the bacteria that cause anthrax.

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image: California’s Whooping Cough Epidemic

California’s Whooping Cough Epidemic

By | June 18, 2014

State health department reports pertussis outbreak and recommends that infants and pregnant women be vaccinated.  

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image: To Finish Off Polio

To Finish Off Polio

By | June 17, 2014

Along with vaccination, antiviral drugs could play a key role in the eradication of poliovirus, but it’s unclear whether today’s candidate therapies will withstand the challenges of the clinic.

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image: Fragmented Landscapes, More Outbreaks?

Fragmented Landscapes, More Outbreaks?

By | June 13, 2014

Study finds that ribwort plants in well-connected populations fare better when exposed to a fungal pathogen than those in isolated patches.  

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image: MERS Double Publication?

MERS Double Publication?

By | June 11, 2014

Two papers on the same Middle East respiratory syndrome victim hint at uncouth scientific competition and possible laboratory contamination, plus illuminate potential issues within the Saudi Arabian health ministry. 

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image: BRAIN Initiative Asks for $4.5B

BRAIN Initiative Asks for $4.5B

By | June 9, 2014

An advisory committee for the BRAIN Initiative says that to fully fund the goals of the neuroscience research program, taxpayers should fork over $4.5 billion.

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image: Leptin’s Effects

Leptin’s Effects

By | June 2, 2014

The hormone leptin, which signals fullness to animals, acts not only through neurons but through glia, too.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Drunken Monkey</em>

Book Excerpt from The Drunken Monkey

By | June 1, 2014

In Chapter 3, "On the Inebriation of Elephants," author Robert Dudley considers whether tales of tipsy pachyderms and bombed baboons have any basis in scientific truth.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2014

Proof, Caffeinated, A Sting in the Tale, and The Insect Cookbook

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image: Drunks and Monkeys

Drunks and Monkeys

By | June 1, 2014

Understanding our primate ancestors’ relationship with alcohol can inform its use by modern humans.  

5 Comments

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