The Scientist

» infectious disease, culture and evolution

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

By | July 1, 2016

Scientists who study the lifestyle disorder must do a better job of incorporating political and social science into their work.

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image: Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

By | July 1, 2016

An experimental evolution study shows that more cheaters arise when bread mold fungal cells are less related to one another.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | July 1, 2016

Human Genome Project-Write; viruses are alpha predators; Zika and the Olympics

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image: Portable, Rapid Zika Test

Portable, Rapid Zika Test

By | June 30, 2016

A new point-of-care diagnostic enables viral detection at low thresholds.

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image: Nonhuman Primate Model of Zika

Nonhuman Primate Model of Zika

By | June 28, 2016

Researchers infect rhesus macaques with the virus to better study its effects in humans.

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image: Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

By | June 27, 2016

Reptiles, birds, and mammals all produce tiny, bump-like structures during development.   

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image: Mosquito Bites May Worsen Viral Infection

Mosquito Bites May Worsen Viral Infection

By | June 21, 2016

The inflammation may make it easier for viruses like Zika to replicate in a host, according to a mouse study.

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Ancient DNA research suggests that there were two independent agricultural revolutions more than 10,000 years ago.

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World Health Organization concludes the events are unlikely to worsen the viral outbreak.

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