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image: Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

By | June 1, 2017

Parallel evolution in jaws and teeth helped early mammals diversify their diets.

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image: Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

By | May 26, 2017

Two previously overlooked archaeal strains fill an evolutionary gap for microbes.

2 Comments

image: Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

By | May 24, 2017

A fish created by spontaneous androgenesis is the first known vertebrate to arise naturally by this asexual reproductive phenomenon. 

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image: A Triple Threat

A Triple Threat

By | May 22, 2017

The mosquitoes that carry Zika may be able to transmit two other viruses at the same time.

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image: Gene Drive’s Achilles Heel

Gene Drive’s Achilles Heel

By | May 22, 2017

Rare genetic variants could blunt efforts to destroy pest populations. 

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Harvesting lab-raised zebrafish based on their size led to differences in the activity of more than 4,000 genes, as well as changes in allele frequencies of those genes, in the fish that remained.

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The antibodies bind conserved viral parts, allowing them to neutralize all five Ebola types.

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image: Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

By | May 15, 2017

Men have traditionally stolen the spotlight as scientific popularizers on TV, but women are making names for themselves in other formats.

6 Comments

image: Two Confirmed Cases of Ebola in Congo

Two Confirmed Cases of Ebola in Congo

By | May 15, 2017

More than a dozen other individuals are suspected of infection in the central African nation.

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image: Zika's Economic Burden

Zika's Economic Burden

By | May 11, 2017

A new analysis estimates that the viral disease could cost between $183 million and more than $10 billion in the U.S. alone. 

1 Comment

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