The Scientist

» infectious disease, culture and evolution

Most Recent

image: WHO: Ebola Outbreak Underestimated

WHO: Ebola Outbreak Underestimated

By | August 18, 2014

The World Health Organization says the ongoing Ebola outbreak may be worse than their official numbers show and notes that it’s still considering the use of several experimental therapies.

1 Comment

image: Chikungunya Vaccine Clears Phase 1

Chikungunya Vaccine Clears Phase 1

By | August 18, 2014

Early-stage clinical trial yields promising results. 

0 Comments

image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

0 Comments

image: Gene x Gene x Environment

Gene x Gene x Environment

By | August 12, 2014

Chikungunya virus is transmitted through a three-way interaction that hinges on viral strain, mosquito genotype, and ambient temperature, researchers report.

2 Comments

image: Microbes in a Tar Pit

Microbes in a Tar Pit

By | August 8, 2014

Microdroplets of water in a natural asphalt lake are home to active microbial life, a study shows.

1 Comment

image: Serum to Stop Ebola?

Serum to Stop Ebola?

By | August 6, 2014

An experimental monoclonal antibody therapy, tested only in animals, is given to two Americans infected with Ebola virus.

2 Comments

image: How Tinier Theropods Took Flight

How Tinier Theropods Took Flight

By | August 4, 2014

Downsizing dinosaurs was key to the evolution of birds, a study shows. 

0 Comments

image: Cephalopod Coddling

Cephalopod Coddling

By | August 1, 2014

Deep-sea octopus has the longest-known brooding period known for any animal species.

0 Comments

image: Beyond Cat Killing

Beyond Cat Killing

By | August 1, 2014

Capsule reviewed author Ian Leslie sets up his latest book, Curious, about the human propensity to wonder and learn.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Shocked</em>

Book Excerpt from Shocked

By | August 1, 2014

In Chapter 4, “Science fiction, space travel, and the strange science of suspended animation,” author David Casarett describes his brush with adenosine monophosphate and reanimated mice.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal
    News & Opinion Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

    My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

  2. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  3. Genetic Analysis Reveals the Evolutionary History of Dogs
  4. Record-Setting Corn Grows 45 Feet Tall
AAAS