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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | July 25, 2016

More than 1.5 million childbearing women could be at risk of infection; pregnancy delays may be insufficient to prevent infection-related birth abnormalities; second study shows low risk of international spread due to Olympics; CDC updates prevention recommendations

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | July 22, 2016

Possible case of locally acquired infection in Florida; experimental vaccine approved for US clinical trials

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image: Unexplained Zika Case in Utah

Unexplained Zika Case in Utah

By | July 18, 2016

Health officials are investigating a case of Zika infection in a patient who acquired the virus while caring for an infected relative who died this month.

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A woman in New York who tested positive for the virus passed it on to her male partner, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Blood Sugar</em>

Book Excerpt from Blood Sugar

By | July 1, 2016

Author Anthony Ryan Hatch relays his personal experience with metabolic syndrome.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

By | July 1, 2016

Scientists who study the lifestyle disorder must do a better job of incorporating political and social science into their work.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | July 1, 2016

Human Genome Project-Write; viruses are alpha predators; Zika and the Olympics

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image: Portable, Rapid Zika Test

Portable, Rapid Zika Test

By | June 30, 2016

A new point-of-care diagnostic enables viral detection at low thresholds.

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image: Nonhuman Primate Model of Zika

Nonhuman Primate Model of Zika

By | June 28, 2016

Researchers infect rhesus macaques with the virus to better study its effects in humans.

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