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image: Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

By | January 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “The Green Web,” author Alan de Queiroz describes the evolutionary journey taken by a South American species of sundew plant.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2014

Are Dolphins Really Smart?, Newton's Football, Outsider Scientists, and We Are Our Brains

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image: Evolution’s Stowaways

Evolution’s Stowaways

By | January 1, 2014

Terrestrial mammals, carnivorous plants, and even burrowing reptiles have spread around the globe by braving the seven seas. These chance ocean crossings are rewriting the story of Earth’s biogeography.

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image: Fantastical Fish, circa 1719

Fantastical Fish, circa 1719

By | January 1, 2014

A collection of colorful drawings compiled by publisher Louis Renard sheds light on eighteenth-century science.

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image: Outwitting the Perfect Pathogen

Outwitting the Perfect Pathogen

By | January 1, 2014

Tuberculosis is exquisitely adapted to the human body. Researchers need a new game plan for beating it.

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image: Renard's Menagerie

Renard's Menagerie

By | January 1, 2014

Some of the fantastical marine life depicted in a rare, 18th-century book

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image: The Bright Side of Prions

The Bright Side of Prions

By | January 1, 2014

Associated with numerous neurological diseases, misfolded proteins may also play decisive roles in normal cellular functioning.  

6 Comments

image: Flu Vaccine-Narcolepsy Link Explained?

Flu Vaccine-Narcolepsy Link Explained?

By | December 20, 2013

A new study sheds light on why those who received GlaxoSmithKline’s flu vaccine were at an increased risk of developing the sleep disorder.

4 Comments

image: Test Scores Are in the Genes

Test Scores Are in the Genes

By | December 16, 2013

More than school or family environment, a child’s genetics influences high school exam results.

7 Comments

image: Gender-based Citation Disparities

Gender-based Citation Disparities

By | December 12, 2013

An analysis reveals that papers with women as key authors are cited less often than those with men as key authors.

2 Comments

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