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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: <em>Wolbachia</em>-infected Mosquitoes Released in Florida

Wolbachia-infected Mosquitoes Released in Florida

By | April 19, 2017

The bacterium causes eggs to die, and spreading treated insects is expected to curb Aedes aegypti populations.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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image: Parasitic Worm Spreads in Hawaii

Parasitic Worm Spreads in Hawaii

By | April 11, 2017

The roundworm that causes rat lungworm disease has infected at least six people on the island of Maui in the last three months.

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Infants born to mothers who were infected with the virus during pregnancy—including babies who do not show signs of microcephaly—may experience other birth defects.

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image: Texas Considers GM Mosquitoes

Texas Considers GM Mosquitoes

By | March 28, 2017

In an effort to prevent the spread of Zika virus, Harris County officials are in discussions with Oxitec to release insects engineered to produce short-lived offspring.

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The pathogenic fungus that has decimated populations of bats throughout the eastern United States has surfaced in the state for the first time, although none of the bats appear diseased.

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image: Pathway to Polio Virulence Revealed

Pathway to Polio Virulence Revealed

By | March 23, 2017

Using epidemiological and laboratory data, scientists have mapped out a sequence of mutations through which the attenuated oral polio vaccine reverts to a virulent virus.

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image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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