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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: New Legs to Stand On

New Legs to Stand On

By | June 1, 2015

Reconstructing the past using ancient DNA

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image: Resistance Fighter

Resistance Fighter

By | June 1, 2015

Stuart Levy has spent a lifetime studying mechanisms of antibiotic resistance and crusading to abolish the use of antibiotics in animal feed.

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image: Lost Memories Reactivated in Mice

Lost Memories Reactivated in Mice

By | May 29, 2015

Using optogenetics, researchers excite selected neurons to reinstate a fear memory that had been blocked.

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image: Anthrax Mistakenly Shipped by Military

Anthrax Mistakenly Shipped by Military

By | May 28, 2015

A US Army facility may have inadvertently sent live anthrax spores to government and commercial labs in nine states, and to one US Air Force base abroad, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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image: Ebola’s Cellular Key

Ebola’s Cellular Key

By | May 27, 2015

Scientists studying the basic molecular steps of Ebola infection identify a mammalian protein that is essential for the pathogen to infect mice.

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image: Gene Linked to Pain Insensitivity

Gene Linked to Pain Insensitivity

By | May 27, 2015

People with a congenital disorder that makes them unable to feel pain have mutations in a histone-modifying gene. 

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image: Light Sensors in Cephalopod Skin

Light Sensors in Cephalopod Skin

By | May 21, 2015

Squid, cuttlefish, and octopuses possess vision machinery in their skin.

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image: Model Predicts Zoonotic Hot Spots

Model Predicts Zoonotic Hot Spots

By | May 19, 2015

The midwestern U.S. and central Asia are at high risk for new disease outbreaks from pathogen-bearing rodents, according to a study.

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image: Image of the Day: Amazing Astrocytes

Image of the Day: Amazing Astrocytes

By | May 19, 2015

They aren't neurons, but in rats, glial cells in the brain called astrocytes (red) play a major role in repetitive motions like chewing and breathing.

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