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image: Contributors

Contributors

By and | May 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Serious Putty

Serious Putty

By | May 1, 2016

A naturally occurring clay, used in traditional Native American medicine, shows promise as an antibiotic.

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image: Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection in Monkeys

Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection in Monkeys

By | April 29, 2016

Infusing anti-HIV antibodies provides macaques with protection against infection for up to six months, according to a study.

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image: Zika-Infected Monkeys in Brazil

Zika-Infected Monkeys in Brazil

By | April 28, 2016

The viral strain scientists isolated from two nonhuman primates is identical to the one circulating among humans.

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image: Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

By | April 21, 2016

Housing laboratory mice with those reared in a pet store makes the lab rodents’ immune systems more similar to those of people.

2 Comments

image: “Hunger Hormone” No More?

“Hunger Hormone” No More?

By | April 20, 2016

Ghrelin promotes fat storage not feeding, according to a study.

3 Comments

image: Mapping Worldwide Zika Susceptibility

Mapping Worldwide Zika Susceptibility

By | April 19, 2016

More than 2 billion people may be at risk, according to a map of global environmental suitability for transmission of the virus.

1 Comment

image: Theranos in Criminal Probe

Theranos in Criminal Probe

By | April 19, 2016

Federal officials are investigating whether the diagnostics company misled investors.

2 Comments

image: AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

By | April 18, 2016

The genomics pioneer shares the sessions she most looks forward to at this year’s American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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image: Tracking Zika’s Evolution

Tracking Zika’s Evolution

By | April 15, 2016

Sequence analysis of 41 viral strains reveals more than a half-century of change. 

1 Comment

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