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The Scientist

» infectious disease and evolution

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image: To Finish Off Polio

To Finish Off Polio

By | June 17, 2014

Along with vaccination, antiviral drugs could play a key role in the eradication of poliovirus, but it’s unclear whether today’s candidate therapies will withstand the challenges of the clinic.

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image: Fragmented Landscapes, More Outbreaks?

Fragmented Landscapes, More Outbreaks?

By | June 13, 2014

Study finds that ribwort plants in well-connected populations fare better when exposed to a fungal pathogen than those in isolated patches.  

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image: Ancient Fish Analyzed

Ancient Fish Analyzed

By | June 13, 2014

Two paleontological findings yield insights into early vertebrate evolution.

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image: Snake Imitators Persist

Snake Imitators Persist

By | June 12, 2014

A harmless snake in the Carolina Sandhills has been mimicking a poisonous species for decades, and has become a better imitator since the latter went extinct.

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image: MERS Double Publication?

MERS Double Publication?

By | June 11, 2014

Two papers on the same Middle East respiratory syndrome victim hint at uncouth scientific competition and possible laboratory contamination, plus illuminate potential issues within the Saudi Arabian health ministry. 

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image: Faces for Fighting?

Faces for Fighting?

By | June 10, 2014

Scientists propose that hominin facial bones evolved for protection against the powerful blows of combat.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Drunken Monkey</em>

Book Excerpt from The Drunken Monkey

By | June 1, 2014

In Chapter 3, "On the Inebriation of Elephants," author Robert Dudley considers whether tales of tipsy pachyderms and bombed baboons have any basis in scientific truth.

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image: Drunks and Monkeys

Drunks and Monkeys

By | June 1, 2014

Understanding our primate ancestors’ relationship with alcohol can inform its use by modern humans.  

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image: For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival

For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival

By | May 29, 2014

Two island populations of male crickets independently evolved to evade parasites by keeping quiet, and have come up with a way to sneak matings with females that still seek the male courtship song.

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image: CDC: Meeting Did Not Spread MERS

CDC: Meeting Did Not Spread MERS

By | May 28, 2014

After more definitive blood tests, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that an Illinois resident who came into close contact with an Indiana MERS patient did not contract the virus, contrary to a prior announcement.

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