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image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: NIH Opposes Editing Human Embryos

NIH Opposes Editing Human Embryos

By | April 30, 2015

Following the publication of a study in which scientists used CRISPR to edit nonviable human embryos, the National Institutes of Health states it will not fund such research.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: Erasing Mitochondrial Mutations

Erasing Mitochondrial Mutations

By | April 23, 2015

Researchers develop a method to selectively remove mutated mitochondrial DNA from the murine germline and single-celled mouse embryos.

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image: Researchers Edit Early Embryos

Researchers Edit Early Embryos

By | April 23, 2015

Investigators in China observed extensive off-target effects when applying CRISPR-mediated gene editing in human zygotes.

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image: Call for Germline Editing Moratorium

Call for Germline Editing Moratorium

By | March 13, 2015

In response to speculation that groups have edited the DNA of human embryos, researchers request that gene editing of human reproductive cells be halted.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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