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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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image: China Admits to “Cancer Villages”

China Admits to “Cancer Villages”

By | February 25, 2013

Officials in the most populous nation on Earth have finally owned up to clusters of the disease around areas beset by industrial waste and other pollutants.

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image: $32K to Swim in Polluted River

$32K to Swim in Polluted River

By | February 19, 2013

A Chinese businessman offers a government official a large monetary reward to take a dip in a river that runs through the town of Ruian.

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image: Drugged Fish Act Different

Drugged Fish Act Different

By | February 14, 2013

A psychiatric drug in the water can cause perch to be less social, more voracious hunters.

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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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image: Treaty to Curb Mercury Pollution

Treaty to Curb Mercury Pollution

By | January 22, 2013

More than 140 nations agree to a plan to limit global mercury emissions.

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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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