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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.


image: China Admits to “Cancer Villages”

China Admits to “Cancer Villages”

By | February 25, 2013

Officials in the most populous nation on Earth have finally owned up to clusters of the disease around areas beset by industrial waste and other pollutants.


image: $32K to Swim in Polluted River

$32K to Swim in Polluted River

By | February 19, 2013

A Chinese businessman offers a government official a large monetary reward to take a dip in a river that runs through the town of Ruian.


image: Drugged Fish Act Different

Drugged Fish Act Different

By | February 14, 2013

A psychiatric drug in the water can cause perch to be less social, more voracious hunters.


image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.


image: Treaty to Curb Mercury Pollution

Treaty to Curb Mercury Pollution

By | January 22, 2013

More than 140 nations agree to a plan to limit global mercury emissions.


image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Searching for Snails

Searching for Snails

By | December 1, 2012

A graduate student rediscovers a snail species officially declared extinct in 2000.

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image: Birds Monitor Pollution

Birds Monitor Pollution

By | November 20, 2012

Homing pigeons and tree swallows are being used to monitor pollution in cities and track environmental clean-up work at former industrial sites.


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