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image: Microbial Smog

Microbial Smog

By | February 3, 2014

Some 1,300 species of microbes, including some associated with allergies and lung disease, are adrift in Beijing’s thick smog.

4 Comments

image: Meiosis Maven

Meiosis Maven

By | February 1, 2014

Fueled by her love of visual data and addicted to chromosomes, Abby Dernburg continues to study how homologous chromosomes find each other during gamete formation.

1 Comment

image: Unmasking Secret Identities

Unmasking Secret Identities

By | February 1, 2014

A tour of techniques for measuring DNA hydroxymethylation

2 Comments

image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.

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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

0 Comments

image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: A Dire Air Pollution Warning

A Dire Air Pollution Warning

By | October 21, 2013

Contaminants in the air are officially carcinogens, according to the World Health Organization.

2 Comments

image: Steroids Stick Around

Steroids Stick Around

By | September 29, 2013

Body-building steroids used to beef up cattle can regenerate themselves in the environment.

3 Comments

image: Influential Ecologist Dies

Influential Ecologist Dies

By | September 24, 2013

Ruth Patrick, who pioneered freshwater pollution monitoring, has passed away at age 105.

1 Comment

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