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image: Steroids Stick Around

Steroids Stick Around

By | September 29, 2013

Body-building steroids used to beef up cattle can regenerate themselves in the environment.

3 Comments

image: Influential Ecologist Dies

Influential Ecologist Dies

By | September 24, 2013

Ruth Patrick, who pioneered freshwater pollution monitoring, has passed away at age 105.

1 Comment

image: Dolphins by Name

Dolphins by Name

By | July 23, 2013

Bottlenose dolphins can recognize and respond to their own “signature whistles,” strengthening the evidence that these whistles function like names.

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image: Opinion: Marine Canaries in the Coalmine

Opinion: Marine Canaries in the Coalmine

By and | July 18, 2013

Seabirds can serve as indicators of pollution.

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image: Plastic Reefs

Plastic Reefs

By | July 17, 2013

Plastic fragments are changing the ecology of the oceans by providing havens for bugs and bacteria.

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image: Particulates from Coal Shorten Lives

Particulates from Coal Shorten Lives

By | July 10, 2013

A policy to provide Northern Chinese residents with free coal for heat ended up reducing their life spans.

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image: Research Behind Bars

Research Behind Bars

By | July 1, 2013

Ecologist Nalini Nadkarni advances forest conservation and science advocacy by enlisting the help of prisoners.

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image: Science on Lockdown

Science on Lockdown

By | July 1, 2013

A forest ecologist comes down from the canopy to bring science to the masses, forming a series of improbable collaborations with prisoners.

3 Comments

image: Sea Bugs

Sea Bugs

By | July 1, 2013

Ocean viruses can impact marine ecosystems in several ways.

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image: An Ocean of Viruses

An Ocean of Viruses

By | July 1, 2013

Viruses abound in the world’s oceans, yet researchers are only beginning to understand how they affect life and chemistry from the water’s surface to the sea floor.

3 Comments

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