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image: ADHD Linked to Structural Differences in the Brain

ADHD Linked to Structural Differences in the Brain

By | February 21, 2017

Imaging data show smaller volumes in several brain regions among people diagnosed with the behavioral disorder.

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image: Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

By | February 17, 2017

A computer algorithm can identify the brains of autism patients with moderate accuracy based on scans taken at six months and one year of age.

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image: Consilience, Episode 1: Smarty Plants

Consilience, Episode 1: Smarty Plants

By | February 13, 2017

A conversation with plant biologists on the age-old dispute over the similarities and differences between plants and animals.

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image: Discovering Novel Antibiotics

Discovering Novel Antibiotics

By | February 1, 2017

Three methods identify and activate silent bacterial gene clusters to uncover new drugs

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Person-to-person transmission of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in US hospitals may be occurring without symptoms, a new study suggests. 

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A CDC report concludes that the woman, who died last August, succumbed to a Klebsiella pneumoniae infection that was resistant to 26 different antibiotics.

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A team of scientists was unable to replicate controversial, high-profile findings published in 2011.

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image: As the Brain Ages, Glial-Cell Gene Expression Changes Most

As the Brain Ages, Glial-Cell Gene Expression Changes Most

By | January 10, 2017

Researchers describe how gene expression in different human brain regions is altered with age.

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image: Neural Mechanism Links Alcohol Consumption to Binge Eating

Neural Mechanism Links Alcohol Consumption to Binge Eating

By | January 10, 2017

Ethanol triggers starvation-activated neurons, leading mice to overeat. 

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Neuroimaging study confirms the fusiform gyrus continues to develop throughout childhood.

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