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Certain drugs could worsen graft-versus-host disease in stem cell transplant patients, scientists show.

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image: Antibiotics From Scratch

Antibiotics From Scratch

By | May 18, 2016

Scientists develop a method for synthesizing hundreds of new macrolide antibiotics.

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image: Tasmanian Devil Antibodies Fight Cancer

Tasmanian Devil Antibodies Fight Cancer

By | May 9, 2016

The proteins could be the key to stopping the transmissible facial tumor disease that is threatening the species.

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image: Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

By | May 5, 2016

Maternal antibodies engender a receptive gut environment for beneficial bacteria in newborn mice.

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image: Copper Stopper

Copper Stopper

By | May 1, 2016

This research found that coating hospital surfaces with copper helped battle microbes and the infections they spread.

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image: Serious Putty

Serious Putty

By | May 1, 2016

A naturally occurring clay, used in traditional Native American medicine, shows promise as an antibiotic.

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image: Nanoscale Defenses

Nanoscale Defenses

By | May 1, 2016

Coating hospital surfaces, surgical equipment, patient implants, and water-delivery systems with nanoscale patterns and particles could curb the rise of hospital-acquired infections.

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image: Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

By | April 21, 2016

Housing laboratory mice with those reared in a pet store makes the lab rodents’ immune systems more similar to those of people.

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image: AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

By | April 18, 2016

The genomics pioneer shares the sessions she most looks forward to at this year’s American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

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