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image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

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A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

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Antibiotic Assistants

By | March 9, 2016

Scientists discover compounds that restore antibiotic efficacy against drug-resistant superbugs.  

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Researchers identify a molecule that protects antibiotic-treated mice from an opportunistic bacterial infection.

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Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: Disclosure of Problematic Scopes Delayed: Report

Disclosure of Problematic Scopes Delayed: Report

By | January 14, 2016

The US Senate has found hospitals, a device maker, and federal regulators dragged their feet on reporting contaminated endoscopes.

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image: Viral Soldiers

Viral Soldiers

By | January 1, 2016

Phage therapy to combat bacterial infections is garnering attention for the second time in 100 years, but solid clinical support for its widespread use is still lacking.

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image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

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