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The Scientist

» antibiotic resistance and ecology

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image: Fewer Female Snail Penises

Fewer Female Snail Penises

By | January 14, 2014

Researchers are now spotting fewer cases of imposex—in which female sea snails develop male sexual organs—as a result of a chemical ban instituted in 2008.

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image: Large Carnivores Under Siege

Large Carnivores Under Siege

By | January 13, 2014

As populations of top predators decline in ecosystems the world over, researchers chart the widespread effects.

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image: Settlement Signal

Settlement Signal

By | January 9, 2014

A marine bacterium generates contractile structures that are essential for the metamorphosis of a tubeworm.

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image: Resistant Wastewater

Resistant Wastewater

By | December 18, 2013

Researchers find an antibiotic resistance gene in wastewater treatment plants in northern China.

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image: Unhealthy Chemicals Linked to Fracking

Unhealthy Chemicals Linked to Fracking

By | December 17, 2013

Water samples collected from natural gas extraction sites in Colorado contain hormone-disrupting chemicals linked to birth defects, infertility, and cancer.

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image: Prove Antibacterials are Safe: FDA

Prove Antibacterials are Safe: FDA

By | December 17, 2013

The Food and Drug Administration is asking companies to produce evidence that their antimicrobial washes do no harm.  

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image: Antibiotic Limits Planned for Farms

Antibiotic Limits Planned for Farms

By | December 11, 2013

The Food and Drug Administration lays out a plan so that farmers will no longer use antibiotics to fatten up animals.  

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image: Biology's Coefficient

Biology's Coefficient

By | December 1, 2013

Joel Cohen uses the tools of mathematics to deconstruct questions of life.

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image: Waiting in the Wings

Waiting in the Wings

By | December 1, 2013

A century’s worth of collected butterflies shed light on how climate change threatens the survival of early-emerging species.

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image: Next Generation: Bactericidal Surface

Next Generation: Bactericidal Surface

By | November 26, 2013

A synthetic material covered in nano-spikes resembling those found on insect wings is an effective killer of diverse microbes.

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