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image: Untreatable Gonorrhea Rising Globally

Untreatable Gonorrhea Rising Globally

By | July 7, 2017

Fifty countries report strains of the bacteria that are resistant to last-resort antibiotics.

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image: Image of the Day: Fungal Fireworks

Image of the Day: Fungal Fireworks

By | June 26, 2017

The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus begins to grow biofilms as it develops into a larger intertwined network.

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The discovery of peptides, enzymes, and other gene products that confer antibiotic resistance could give clues to how it develops.

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Lactobacillus parafarraginis metabolites hindered the growth of multiple, distantly related bacterial pathogens. 

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The giant lizards have numerous microbicidal compounds in their blood.

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image: Tetracycline Inventor Dies

Tetracycline Inventor Dies

By | March 15, 2017

Lloyd Conover, a longtime chemist at Pfizer, pioneered the concept of chemically altering natural antibiotics to create new drugs.

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image: WHO Lists Antibiotic Development Priorities

WHO Lists Antibiotic Development Priorities

By | February 27, 2017

The World Health Organization outlines critical-, high-, and medium-priority antibiotic development initiatives, calling on the public and private sectors to invest in additional R&D.

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image: Discovering Novel Antibiotics

Discovering Novel Antibiotics

By | February 1, 2017

Three methods identify and activate silent bacterial gene clusters to uncover new drugs

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Person-to-person transmission of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in US hospitals may be occurring without symptoms, a new study suggests. 

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A CDC report concludes that the woman, who died last August, succumbed to a Klebsiella pneumoniae infection that was resistant to 26 different antibiotics.

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