The Scientist

» antibiotics and neuroscience

Most Recent

image: Stimulating Neurons with Light and Gold

Stimulating Neurons with Light and Gold

By | March 12, 2015

Researchers develop a technique to trigger neural activity in culture using light to heat gold nanoparticles.

0 Comments

image: Widely Used Antibiotics Affect Mitochondria

Widely Used Antibiotics Affect Mitochondria

By | March 12, 2015

From plants to mice and human cells, tetracyclines lead to mitochondrial dysfunction in model organisms.

9 Comments

image: Human Brain Project Reviewed

Human Brain Project Reviewed

By | March 10, 2015

After weathering serious criticism last year, the European Commission–backed effort to map the brain’s neural connections must reform or die, a review panel says.

0 Comments

image: Modifying Memories During Sleep

Modifying Memories During Sleep

By | March 9, 2015

Researchers create a link between a location and a reward in sleeping mice.

2 Comments

image: As the Brain Ages

As the Brain Ages

By | March 1, 2015

See human brains age in week-by-week time lapse images that divulge the existence of tiny strokes that damage white matter.

2 Comments

image: Tricky Transfections

Tricky Transfections

By | March 1, 2015

A combination of microinjection and electroporation inserts genes into hard-to-reach cells.

2 Comments

image: Neuroscience of Marijuana Munchies

Neuroscience of Marijuana Munchies

By | February 18, 2015

Cannabinoids cause appetite-suppressing neurons to produce an appetite-stimulating hormone in mice.

1 Comment

image: Anticipating Resistance

Anticipating Resistance

By | February 16, 2015

Using computational algorithms and experimental evolution, researchers are predicting antimicrobial-resistance patterns to improve drug design. 

3 Comments

image: “Inner GPS” Support

“Inner GPS” Support

By | February 5, 2015

Grid cells—the neurons that function as a spatial navigation system—require input from another set of neurons, a rat study shows.

2 Comments

image: B Cell Bosses

B Cell Bosses

By | February 1, 2015

Gut bacteria in mice spur regulatory B cells to differentiate and release an anti-inflammatory cytokine.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. NYU Halts Studies, Suspends Investigator
    The Nutshell NYU Halts Studies, Suspends Investigator

    Experiments conducted at the New York University School of Medicine violated several research standards, according to US Food and Drug Administration investigators.

  2. Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory
  3. The Meaning of Pupil Dilation
    Daily News The Meaning of Pupil Dilation

    Scientists are using pupil measurements to study a wide range of psychological processes and to get a glimpse into the mind.

  4. Brexit’s Effects on Science
Biosearch Technologies