The Scientist

» antibiotics and immunology

Most Recent

Manufacturers have not demonstrated the safety or efficacy of 19 antibacterial agents common in hand and body soaps, according to the US Food and Drug Administration.

0 Comments

image: Giant Petri Dish Displays Evolution in Space and Time

Giant Petri Dish Displays Evolution in Space and Time

By | September 8, 2016

As E. coli bacteria spread over increasingly concentrated antibiotics, researchers discover novel evolutionary pathways that confer resistance.

7 Comments

image: What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

By | September 1, 2016

Odor, taste, and light receptors are present in many different parts of the body, and they have surprisingly diverse functions.

3 Comments

image: One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

By | August 31, 2016

Host and bacterial ligands that interact with the same cell-surface receptor induce different activities in human macrophages. 

0 Comments

image: One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

By | August 26, 2016

Precursor T cells bearing the same antigen receptor adopt two different fates in mice.

1 Comment

Three therapeutic doses administered during early life disturb the animals’ microbiomes and lead to enduring changes in the immune systems of non-obese diabetic mice, researchers report.

0 Comments

image: Antibiotic Resistance Reaches Brazil

Antibiotic Resistance Reaches Brazil

By | August 8, 2016

Scientists detect a colistin-resistance gene in a clinical sample.

0 Comments

image: Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

By | August 1, 2016

In mice, immune cells from the body cavity surrounding organs arrive at the site of damage to chew up the nuclei of dead cells.

0 Comments

image: Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

By | August 1, 2016

Immune cells called macrophages from the peritoneal cavity of mice migrate to injured livers and aid in repair.

0 Comments

image: Nose Bacterium Inhibits <em>S. aureus</em> Growth

Nose Bacterium Inhibits S. aureus Growth

By | July 27, 2016

A study on microbe versus microbe battles within the human nose yields a new antibiotic.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. So You’ve Been Mistaken as a White Nationalist
  2. Opinion: We Need a Replacement for Beall’s List
  3. Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors
    Features Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors

    And the same endocannabinoid system that translates marijuana's buzz-inducing compounds into a high plays crucial roles in health and disease outside the brain.

  4. Doctors’ Advice to Finish Antibiotics Overlooks Resistance
AAAS