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image: Fanning the Flames

Fanning the Flames

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity triggers a fatty acid synthesis pathway, which in turn helps drive T cell differentiation and inflammation.

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image: Not Immune to Fat

Not Immune to Fat

By | November 1, 2015

The effect of a high-fat diet on murine T cells

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image: Weak Support for Malaria Vaccine

Weak Support for Malaria Vaccine

By | October 27, 2015

The World Health Organization recommends more pilot trials.

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image: B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers identify a subset of proinflammatory cytokine-producing B cells that may spark multiple sclerosis-related inflammation.  

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image: Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers design antibody-like proteins to awaken and destroy HIV holdouts.

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image: Frog Microbes May Help Fight Disease

Frog Microbes May Help Fight Disease

By | October 7, 2015

Commensal skin bacteria adjusted their community structure when frogs were exposed to chytrid fungus in a recent study.

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image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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image: Riboswitch Flip Kills Bacteria

Riboswitch Flip Kills Bacteria

By | September 30, 2015

Scientists discover a novel antibacterial molecule that targets a vital RNA regulatory element.

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image: Dengue’s Downfall?

Dengue’s Downfall?

By | September 15, 2015

Researchers characterize a protein that could be key to the virus’s virulence—and to developing a vaccine against the mosquito-borne disease.

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image: Immune Cells Can Deliver Deadly Packages

Immune Cells Can Deliver Deadly Packages

By | September 8, 2015

Much of the CD4+ T-cell death that occurs during HIV infection may be caused by direct delivery of the virus from neighboring cells, a study shows.

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