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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Widely Used Antibiotics Affect Mitochondria

Widely Used Antibiotics Affect Mitochondria

By | March 12, 2015

From plants to mice and human cells, tetracyclines lead to mitochondrial dysfunction in model organisms.

9 Comments

image: Anticipating Resistance

Anticipating Resistance

By | February 16, 2015

Using computational algorithms and experimental evolution, researchers are predicting antimicrobial-resistance patterns to improve drug design. 

3 Comments

image: B Cell Bosses

B Cell Bosses

By | February 1, 2015

Gut bacteria in mice spur regulatory B cells to differentiate and release an anti-inflammatory cytokine.

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image: New Antibiotic from Soil Bacteria

New Antibiotic from Soil Bacteria

By | January 7, 2015

Researchers have isolated a new kind of antibiotic from a previously unknown and uncultured bacterial genus.  

3 Comments

image: Fat to the Rescue

Fat to the Rescue

By | January 5, 2015

Adipocytes under the skin help fight infections by producing an antimicrobial agent.

2 Comments

image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

8 Comments

image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

image: Antibiotic Resistance Among Wildlife

Antibiotic Resistance Among Wildlife

By | December 11, 2014

Even animals that live far from humans are developing resistance to antibiotics.

2 Comments

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