The Scientist

» antibiotics and ecology

Most Recent

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

1 Comment

image: Anticipating Resistance

Anticipating Resistance

By | February 16, 2015

Using computational algorithms and experimental evolution, researchers are predicting antimicrobial-resistance patterns to improve drug design. 

3 Comments

image: B Cell Bosses

B Cell Bosses

By | February 1, 2015

Gut bacteria in mice spur regulatory B cells to differentiate and release an anti-inflammatory cytokine.

0 Comments

image: New Antibiotic from Soil Bacteria

New Antibiotic from Soil Bacteria

By | January 7, 2015

Researchers have isolated a new kind of antibiotic from a previously unknown and uncultured bacterial genus.  

3 Comments

image: Fat to the Rescue

Fat to the Rescue

By | January 5, 2015

Adipocytes under the skin help fight infections by producing an antimicrobial agent.

2 Comments

image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

1 Comment

image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

0 Comments

image: Antibiotic Resistance Among Wildlife

Antibiotic Resistance Among Wildlife

By | December 11, 2014

Even animals that live far from humans are developing resistance to antibiotics.

2 Comments

image: Merck Buys Cubist for $8.4B

Merck Buys Cubist for $8.4B

By | December 11, 2014

Hours after the pharmaceutical giant announced the acquisition, a federal judge invalidated key patents behind the antibiotic maker’s most lucrative product.

0 Comments

image: Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

By | December 1, 2014

By horizontal gene transfer, an antibacterial gene family has dispersed to a plant, an insect, several fungi, and an archaeon.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Next Generation: Nanotube Scaffolds Reconnect Spinal Neurons
  2. Mapping the Human Connectome
    Daily News Mapping the Human Connectome

    A new map of human cortex combines data from multiple imaging modalities and comprises 180 distinct regions.

  3. Stroke Alters Gut Microbiome, Impacting Recovery
  4. Your Office Has a Distinct Microbiome
RayBiotech