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image: Beyond the Blueprint

Beyond the Blueprint

By , and | September 1, 2014

In addition to serving as a set of instructions to build an individual, the genome can influence neighboring organisms and, potentially, entire ecosystems.

9 Comments

image: On the Other Hand

On the Other Hand

By | September 1, 2014

Handedness, a conspicuous but enigmatic human trait, may be shared by other animals. What does it mean for evolution and brain function?

6 Comments

image: Walking Fish Model Evolution

Walking Fish Model Evolution

By | August 28, 2014

Raising a semi-terrestrial species on land highlights the role of developmental plasticity in the evolutionary transition from water to land.

3 Comments

image: Chimps Empath-eyes?

Chimps Empath-eyes?

By | August 25, 2014

Chimpanzees may reinforce social bonds by involuntarily mimicking a fellow chimp’s pupil size.

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image: How Hummingbirds Taste Nectar

How Hummingbirds Taste Nectar

By | August 21, 2014

Hummingbirds perceive sweetness through a receptor with which other vertebrates taste savory foods. 

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image: Obscured Like an Octopus

Obscured Like an Octopus

By | August 21, 2014

Cephalopod skin inspires engineers to design sheets of adaptive camouflage sensors. 

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image: Antibiotics, Immunity, and Obesity

Antibiotics, Immunity, and Obesity

By | August 14, 2014

Low doses of antibiotics early in life lead to adult obesity in mice, a study shows.

3 Comments

A measure moving through the California legislature requires farmers to obtain a prescription to administer antibiotics to livestock.

1 Comment

image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Gut’s Earliest Bacterial Colonizers

Gut’s Earliest Bacterial Colonizers

By | August 11, 2014

The pace at which bacterial groups take root in the gastrointestinal tracts of premature infants is more tied to developmental age than time since birth.

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