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» antibiotics and evolution

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image: Not So Different

Not So Different

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers unearth little evidence to suggest modern humans are superior to their Neanderthal ancestors.

4 Comments

image: A Wilder Europe

A Wilder Europe

By | May 1, 2014

An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.

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image: Where the Wild Things Were

Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

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image: Evolutionarily Distinct Birds Ranked

Evolutionarily Distinct Birds Ranked

By | April 11, 2014

Researchers collate a list of the 100 most rare and unique avian species facing extinction.

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image: Predicting MRSA Toxicity

Predicting MRSA Toxicity

By | April 10, 2014

A comparative genomic study shows that researchers can use genetic signatures to predict the toxicity of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

1 Comment

image: Stripes Shoo Flies

Stripes Shoo Flies

By | April 4, 2014

Zebras evolved stripes to prevent pesky biting flies from landing on them, a study finds.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2014

April 2014's selection of notable quotes

2 Comments

image: Overcoming Resistance

Overcoming Resistance

By | April 1, 2014

In the face of bacterial threats that can evade modern medicines, researchers are trying every trick in the book to develop new, effective antibiotics.

4 Comments

image: Pharma Firms Comply with New Antibiotics Rules

Pharma Firms Comply with New Antibiotics Rules

By | March 31, 2014

Most drug manufacturers agree to follow the Food and Drug Administration’s new labeling guidelines for antibiotics used in farm animals.

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image: Engineered Microbes Act as Sensors

Engineered Microbes Act as Sensors

By | March 18, 2014

Souped-up E. coli can detect an antibiotic within the guts of live mice, researchers show.

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