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image: Is Earth Special?

Is Earth Special?

By | March 1, 2014

Reconsidering the uniqueness of life on our planet

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2014

March 2014's selection of notable quotes

2 Comments

image: Week in Review: February 24–28

Week in Review: February 24–28

By | February 28, 2014

New PLOS data sharing rules; mouse cortical connectome published; reprogramming astrocytes into neurons and fibroblasts into hepatocytes

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image: New Cortical Connectome Online

New Cortical Connectome Online

By | February 27, 2014

Researchers offer a freely available map of the connections throughout the mouse cortex.  

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image: Making New Spinal Neurons

Making New Spinal Neurons

By | February 25, 2014

With a single gene, scientists reprogram supporting cells in the spines of living mice into new neurons.

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image: Preventing Fear

Preventing Fear

By | February 24, 2014

Scientists identify hippocampal neurons involved in encoding fear in mice.

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image: Week in Review: February 17–21

Week in Review: February 17–21

By | February 21, 2014

Human vs. dog brains; widespread neuronal regeneration in human adult brain; honeybee disease strikes wild insects; trouble replicating stress-induced stem cells

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image: Imaging Musical Improv

Imaging Musical Improv

By | February 21, 2014

Some areas of the brain that typically process language are active in jazz musicians who are improvising, a study shows.

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image: Imaging the Canine Brain

Imaging the Canine Brain

By | February 20, 2014

Researchers use comparative neuroimaging to study the dog’s auditory cortex.

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image: Lifelong Neuronal Rebirth

Lifelong Neuronal Rebirth

By | February 20, 2014

Neuronal regeneration in the human adult brain is more widespread than previously thought. 

1 Comment

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