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image: An Eye for Detail

An Eye for Detail

By | October 1, 2014

Vision researcher John Dowling has spent a lifetime studying the neural architecture of the retina. He is closing his laboratory after 53 years, opting to extend these studies as a postdoc.

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Contributors

By | October 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Eye Spies

Eye Spies

By | October 1, 2014

An issue highlighting advances in vision research

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image: Guiding Light

Guiding Light

By | October 1, 2014

Retinal glial cells acting as optical fibers shuttle longer wavelengths of light to individual cones.

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image: Joeanna Arthur: Charting a Path

Joeanna Arthur: Charting a Path

By | October 1, 2014

Project Scientist, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. Age: 32

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image: One Fish, Two Fish

One Fish, Two Fish

By | October 1, 2014

Despite a lack of vision, a blind cavefish can count. Sort of.

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image: Sound and Light Show

Sound and Light Show

By | October 1, 2014

Sounds trigger a response in the visual cortex that predicts how accurately a person can identify a visual target.

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image: $300M Boost for BRAIN

$300M Boost for BRAIN

By | September 30, 2014

Mix of public, private, philanthropic, and academic investments will fund additional BRAIN Initiative-related projects.

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image: Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

By | September 25, 2014

Using citation statistics, the firm forecasts which researchers are likely to take home science’s top honors this year.

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image: Unconscious Effort

Unconscious Effort

By | September 16, 2014

People can categorize words while asleep, a study shows.

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