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image: Single Neuron-Imaging Bot

Single Neuron-Imaging Bot

By | February 1, 2014

New technology probes the functional unit of nervous transmission.

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image: Brains in Action

Brains in Action

By | February 1, 2014

Neuroscientists are automating neural imaging and recording, allowing them to monitor increasingly large swaths of the brain in living, behaving animals.  

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image: Week in Review: January 27–31

Week in Review: January 27–31

By | January 31, 2014

Stimulus-triggered pluripotency; antioxidants speed lung tumor growth; the importance of seminal vesicles; how a plant pathogen jumps hosts

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image: Inner Neanderthal

Inner Neanderthal

By | January 30, 2014

Two studies demonstrate the extent of Neanderthal DNA that persists in modern human genomes.

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image: Rethinking Pre-Agricultural Humans

Rethinking Pre-Agricultural Humans

By | January 28, 2014

Analysis of a 7,000-year-old human genome suggests that Mesolithic people had relatively dark skin and had begun to evolve pathogen resistance characteristic of modern Europeans. 

3 Comments

image: New River Dolphin

New River Dolphin

By | January 27, 2014

DNA sequencing study reveals a new river dolphin species in South America.

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image: Week in Review: January 20–24

Week in Review: January 20–24

By | January 24, 2014

Mistimed sleep disrupts human transcriptome; canine tumor genome; de novo Drosophila genes; UVA light lowers blood pressure; aquatic microfauna fight frog-killing fungus

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image: <em>Drosophila</em>’s New Genes

Drosophila’s New Genes

By | January 23, 2014

An analysis of the transcriptomes of several fruit fly strains reveals dozens of possible de novo genes in each.

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image: Schizophrenia’s Intricacies

Schizophrenia’s Intricacies

By | January 23, 2014

Two studies provide insight into the genetics of the disorder and show again how complex it is.

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image: Visualizing X Chromosome Inactivation

Visualizing X Chromosome Inactivation

By | January 21, 2014

Researchers develop mouse lines to help them see whether the maternal or paternal X chromosome is inactivated.

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