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image: Infographic: Taking Note of Singing Errors

Infographic: Taking Note of Singing Errors

By | March 1, 2017

Birds' brains respond to distorted songs with changes in dopamine signaling.

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image: Bats Sing Sort of Like Birds

Bats Sing Sort of Like Birds

By | March 1, 2017

Some bat vocalizations resemble bird songs, though at higher frequencies, and as researchers unveil the behaviors’ neural underpinnings, the similarities may run even deeper.

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image: Researchers Study Rodent Songs They Can’t Hear

Researchers Study Rodent Songs They Can’t Hear

By | March 1, 2017

Mice and rats produce ultrasonic signals to attract mates.

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image: Untangling the Social Webs in Frog Choruses

Untangling the Social Webs in Frog Choruses

By | March 1, 2017

Frogs and other anurans call to attract mates, and individuals must strive for their voices to be heard in the crowd.

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image: Dancing with the Science Stars

Dancing with the Science Stars

By | March 1, 2017

Watch Profilee Erich Jarvis salsa dancing with a professional company.

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image: From Cricket Choruses to <em>Drosophila</em> Calls

From Cricket Choruses to Drosophila Calls

By | March 1, 2017

A handful of insect species communicate using auditory signals—sounds that researchers have dubbed “song.”

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image: Meeting BRAMS

Meeting BRAMS

By | March 1, 2017

Visit the International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research, located in Montreal, to see the research seeking to decipher humans’ relationship to music.

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image: The Mystery of Whale Song

The Mystery of Whale Song

By | March 1, 2017

Structured whale songs are shared by group members and evolve over time, but the calls’ functions are still unclear.

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image: Fish Use a Variety of Sounds to Communicate

Fish Use a Variety of Sounds to Communicate

By | March 1, 2017

Many fish species click, grunt, growl, grumble, or hum—but is it music?

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image: Song of Ourselves

Song of Ourselves

By | March 1, 2017

“Nature’s melodies” may be a human construct that says more about us than about the musicality of other animals.

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