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image: From Cricket Choruses to <em>Drosophila</em> Calls

From Cricket Choruses to Drosophila Calls

By | March 1, 2017

A handful of insect species communicate using auditory signals—sounds that researchers have dubbed “song.”

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image: Meeting BRAMS

Meeting BRAMS

By | March 1, 2017

Visit the International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research, located in Montreal, to see the research seeking to decipher humans’ relationship to music.

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image: The Mystery of Whale Song

The Mystery of Whale Song

By | March 1, 2017

Structured whale songs are shared by group members and evolve over time, but the calls’ functions are still unclear.

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image: Fish Use a Variety of Sounds to Communicate

Fish Use a Variety of Sounds to Communicate

By | March 1, 2017

Many fish species click, grunt, growl, grumble, or hum—but is it music?

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image: Song of Ourselves

Song of Ourselves

By | March 1, 2017

“Nature’s melodies” may be a human construct that says more about us than about the musicality of other animals.

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image: How Bacteria Interfere with Insect Reproduction

How Bacteria Interfere with Insect Reproduction

By | February 28, 2017

Scientists identify the genes responsible for bacteria-controlled sterility in arthropods.

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image: Henrietta Lacks’s Family Seeks Compensation

Henrietta Lacks’s Family Seeks Compensation

By | February 16, 2017

Family members of Lacks, the donor behind the widely used HeLa cell line, are planning to sue Johns Hopkins University.

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image: Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

By | February 1, 2017

Nonliving cells developed in the lab can communicate chemically with living bacteria, according to a study.

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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