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image: Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

By | January 1, 2015

Social adversity shapes humans’ immune systems—and probably their susceptibility to disease—by altering the expression of large groups of genes.

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image: Reprogramming Redux

Reprogramming Redux

By | December 18, 2014

Can mechanical forces alone be manipulated to create stem-like cells?

1 Comment

image: Honeybee Compound for Hair Loss?

Honeybee Compound for Hair Loss?

By | December 11, 2014

Propolis, a natural product used by honeybees to repair their hives, stimulates hair growth in shaved mice.

1 Comment

image: Enzyme Design

Enzyme Design

By | December 3, 2014

Researchers create synthetic enzymes in the lab, encoded by artificial genetic material.

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image: A Cellar’s Cellular Treasure, 1992

A Cellar’s Cellular Treasure, 1992

By | December 1, 2014

A spring cleaning led to the rediscovery of Theodor Boveri’s microscope slides, presumed lost during World War II.

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image: Bespoke Cell Jackets

Bespoke Cell Jackets

By | December 1, 2014

Scientists make hydrogel coats for individual cells that can be tailored to specific research questions.

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image: New Piece of a Mysterious Channel

New Piece of a Mysterious Channel

By | November 25, 2014

Researchers have nailed down yet another component of the mechanotransduction complex responsible for relaying signals from hair cells in the ear.

1 Comment

image: Beat Deaf

Beat Deaf

By | November 11, 2014

Trouble keeping a rhythm may come from a mismatch between perception and action, a study shows.

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image: Mapping the Human Proteome

Mapping the Human Proteome

By | November 10, 2014

A comprehensive map of human proteins throughout the body identifies the testes as home to the most unique blend of gene products.

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image: Birdsong Breakdown

Birdsong Breakdown

By | November 4, 2014

The hermit thrush favors harmonies like those in human music.

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