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image: The Mystery of Whale Song

The Mystery of Whale Song

By | March 1, 2017

Structured whale songs are shared by group members and evolve over time, but the calls’ functions are still unclear.

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image: Fish Use a Variety of Sounds to Communicate

Fish Use a Variety of Sounds to Communicate

By | March 1, 2017

Many fish species click, grunt, growl, grumble, or hum—but is it music?

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image: Song of Ourselves

Song of Ourselves

By | March 1, 2017

“Nature’s melodies” may be a human construct that says more about us than about the musicality of other animals.

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image: Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

By | February 17, 2017

A computer algorithm can identify the brains of autism patients with moderate accuracy based on scans taken at six months and one year of age.

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The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center researcher links complex traits to the genes that underlie them.

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image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By | February 1, 2017

Instrumental in launching Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, Elliot Meyerowitz has since driven the use of computational modeling to study developmental biology.

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image: Science Your Plants!

Science Your Plants!

By | February 1, 2017

CalTech researcher Elliot Meyerowitz describes how plant genetics influences growth and productivity.

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image: Unique Antibodies Open Path Toward New HIV Vaccines

Unique Antibodies Open Path Toward New HIV Vaccines

By | January 27, 2017

A family of broadly neutralizing antibodies from a chronically infected donor provides a schematic for designing vaccines and treatments that target multiple strains of the virus.

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Children born to obese parents are at increased risk of failing motor development and cognitive tests, according to an NIH-led study.

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image: Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

By | December 16, 2016

A finding of misconduct spurs the retraction of a Science paper claiming to have identified a protein in mice that boosted immunity to both viruses and cancer.

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