The Scientist

» music and developmental biology

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image: Dancing with the Science Stars

Dancing with the Science Stars

By | March 1, 2017

Watch Profilee Erich Jarvis salsa dancing with a professional company.

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image: From Cricket Choruses to <em>Drosophila</em> Calls

From Cricket Choruses to Drosophila Calls

By | March 1, 2017

A handful of insect species communicate using auditory signals—sounds that researchers have dubbed “song.”

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image: Meeting BRAMS

Meeting BRAMS

By | March 1, 2017

Visit the International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research, located in Montreal, to see the research seeking to decipher humans’ relationship to music.

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image: The Mystery of Whale Song

The Mystery of Whale Song

By | March 1, 2017

Structured whale songs are shared by group members and evolve over time, but the calls’ functions are still unclear.

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image: Fish Use a Variety of Sounds to Communicate

Fish Use a Variety of Sounds to Communicate

By | March 1, 2017

Many fish species click, grunt, growl, grumble, or hum—but is it music?

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image: Song of Ourselves

Song of Ourselves

By | March 1, 2017

“Nature’s melodies” may be a human construct that says more about us than about the musicality of other animals.

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image: Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

By | February 17, 2017

A computer algorithm can identify the brains of autism patients with moderate accuracy based on scans taken at six months and one year of age.

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The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center researcher links complex traits to the genes that underlie them.

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image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By | February 1, 2017

Instrumental in launching Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, Elliot Meyerowitz has since driven the use of computational modeling to study developmental biology.

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image: Science Your Plants!

Science Your Plants!

By | February 1, 2017

CalTech researcher Elliot Meyerowitz describes how plant genetics influences growth and productivity.

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