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 Zebra finches reared by another species learn to sing their foster parents’ song with rhythms characteristic of their genetic background.

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image: John Iversen Explores our Perception of Musical Rhythm

John Iversen Explores our Perception of Musical Rhythm

By | March 1, 2017

At the Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience at the University of California, San Diego, the researcher studies the neurobiology of music perception.

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image: Music Tailored to Animals’ Tastes

Music Tailored to Animals’ Tastes

By | March 1, 2017

The evidence is equivocal on whether animals dig human songs, so scientists set out to make music that mimics their soundscapes.

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image: Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

By | March 1, 2017

Studies of remote Amazonian villages reveal how culture influences our musical preferences.

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Zebra finches dial down dopamine signaling when they hear errors in a song performance.

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image: Newton’s Color Theory, ca. 1665

Newton’s Color Theory, ca. 1665

By | March 1, 2017

Newton’s rainbow forms the familiar ROYGBIV because he thought the range of visible colors should be analogous to the seven-note musical scale.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | March 1, 2017

Music, the future of American science, and more

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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: Singing In the Brain

Singing In the Brain

By | March 1, 2017

His first love was dance, but Erich Jarvis has long courted another love—understanding how the brain learns vocalization.

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Music sounds very different to cochlear implant users. Researchers are trying to improve the experience.

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