The Scientist

» music, evolution and disease/medicine

Most Recent

image: Week in Review: November 11–15

Week in Review: November 11–15

By | November 15, 2013

Combating bacterial persistence; ancient canine evolution; T cells and transplants; sharing omics data and code

0 Comments

image: Origin of Domestic Dogs

Origin of Domestic Dogs

By | November 14, 2013

New analysis suggests that domestic dogs evolved from European wolves that interacted with human hunter-gatherers.

7 Comments

image: Felid Fossils

Felid Fossils

By | November 13, 2013

Paleontologists discover the oldest evidence yet suggesting that big cats originated in Asia.

0 Comments

image: T cells and Transplantation

T cells and Transplantation

By | November 13, 2013

Drug-resistant immune cells protect patients from graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplant.

0 Comments

image: Dissociating Sound and Touch

Dissociating Sound and Touch

By | November 12, 2013

Trained musicians appear to have superior multisensory processing skills, according to research presented at the Society for Neuroscience conference.

1 Comment

image: Time for T cells

Time for T cells

By | November 7, 2013

Circadian rhythms control the development of inflammatory T cells, while jet lag sends their production into overdrive.

1 Comment

image: Gut Microbes May Impact Autoimmunity

Gut Microbes May Impact Autoimmunity

By | November 6, 2013

Researchers show that the prevalence of one genus of bacteria correlates with the onset of rheumatoid arthritis.

1 Comment

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | November 1, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

1 Comment

image: Bad Blood

Bad Blood

By | November 1, 2013

A rare bleeding disorder leads scientists to uncover an unusual blood component that might be common to us all.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2013

Tracks and Shadows, The Gap, The Cure in the Code, and An Appetite for Wonder

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  2. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  3. Sequencing Reveals Genomic Diversity of the Human Brain
  4. Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts
    The Nutshell Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

    An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

RayBiotech