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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | March 1, 2017

Music, the future of American science, and more

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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: Singing In the Brain

Singing In the Brain

By | March 1, 2017

His first love was dance, but Erich Jarvis has long courted another love—understanding how the brain learns vocalization.

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Music sounds very different to cochlear implant users. Researchers are trying to improve the experience.

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Researchers investigate the unusual association of musical sounds with tastes or colors through the lens of another perceptual quirk.

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image: Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

By | March 1, 2017

Researchers are using multiple methods to study the origins of humans’ capacity to process and produce music, and there’s no shortage of debate about the results.

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image: Song Around the Animal Kingdom

Song Around the Animal Kingdom

By | March 1, 2017

Diverse species are said to sing, but music is in the ear of the beholder.

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image: Birds May Make Music, But They Lack Rhythm

Birds May Make Music, But They Lack Rhythm

By | March 1, 2017

Birdsong bears a striking resemblance to human music, but it’s not yet clear that birds interpret it that way.

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image: Exploring the Mechanisms of Music Therapy

Exploring the Mechanisms of Music Therapy

By | March 1, 2017

The principles of neuroplasticity may underlie the positive effects of music therapy in treating a diversity of diseases.

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image: Infographic: Mapping Musicality

Infographic: Mapping Musicality

By | March 1, 2017

Huge areas of the brain respond to any sort of auditory stimulus, making it difficult for scientists to nail down regions that are important for music processing.

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