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image: Spain and U.S. Deal with Ebola

Spain and U.S. Deal with Ebola

By | October 8, 2014

The first case of Ebola contracted outside of West Africa has the Spanish government scrambling to contain the deadly virus. In the U.S., the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the country has died.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Recruiting Anthrax to Oncology

Recruiting Anthrax to Oncology

By | September 26, 2014

In the latest development in trying to use Bacillus anthracis to kill cancer, researchers send “antibody mimics” inside tumor cells.

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image: Pneumonia-Causing Bacteria Poke Holes in Heart

Pneumonia-Causing Bacteria Poke Holes in Heart

By | September 18, 2014

Microlesions in heart muscle may contribute to cardiac complications in elderly patients, a study shows.

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image: Next Generation: Blood-Cleansing Device

Next Generation: Blood-Cleansing Device

By | September 14, 2014

An external device that mimics the structure of a spleen can cleanse the blood of rats with acute sepsis, ridding the fluid of pathogens and toxins.

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image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

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image: More Skeletons in Gov’t Lab Closets

More Skeletons in Gov’t Lab Closets

By | September 9, 2014

A search for long-forgotten pathogens at the US National Institutes of Health prompts the discovery of toxins and disease-causing agents.

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image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

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image: The Iceman Cometh

The Iceman Cometh

By | September 1, 2014

Meet Ötzi, the Copper Age ice man who is helping scientists reconstruct changes in the population genetics of the red deer he hunted.

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image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

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