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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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image: Mom’s Mitochondria Affect Pup Longevity

Mom’s Mitochondria Affect Pup Longevity

By | October 9, 2014

Mitochondrial mutations inherited from the mother can shorten a mouse’s lifespan.

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image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

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image: The Genetics of Menarche

The Genetics of Menarche

By | July 24, 2014

Hundreds of loci in the genome are associated with the age at which a girl starts menstruating.

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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image: A Rock and a Hard Place

A Rock and a Hard Place

By | July 1, 2014

Meet the retired chemical engineer who has made quite the impression on paleoentomology by uncovering ancient secrets of insect coitus.

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image: Speaking of Sex

Speaking of Sex

By | July 1, 2014

July 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Sex Paradox

The Sex Paradox

By | July 1, 2014

Birds do it. Bees do it. We do it. But not without a physical, biochemical, and genetic price. How did the costly practice of sex become so commonplace?

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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.

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