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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: The Genetics of Menarche

The Genetics of Menarche

By | July 24, 2014

Hundreds of loci in the genome are associated with the age at which a girl starts menstruating.

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image: A Rock and a Hard Place

A Rock and a Hard Place

By | July 1, 2014

Meet the retired chemical engineer who has made quite the impression on paleoentomology by uncovering ancient secrets of insect coitus.

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image: Speaking of Sex

Speaking of Sex

By | July 1, 2014

July 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Sex Paradox

The Sex Paradox

By | July 1, 2014

Birds do it. Bees do it. We do it. But not without a physical, biochemical, and genetic price. How did the costly practice of sex become so commonplace?

12 Comments

image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

1 Comment

image: Replication Gone Wrong

Replication Gone Wrong

By | May 29, 2014

Efforts to reproduce an experimental psychology study yield failure, accusations, and ultimately, discourse on how to improve the process.

0 Comments

image: Female Pigs May Sense Sex of Sperm

Female Pigs May Sense Sex of Sperm

By | May 21, 2014

The oviducts of pigs exhibit different gene expression profiles depending on their exposure to sperm with either an X or a Y chromosome, a study shows. 

3 Comments

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