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image: Engineered Microbe Could Ease Switch to Grass

Engineered Microbe Could Ease Switch to Grass

By | June 2, 2014

Researchers modify a heat-loving bacterium so it can produce biofuel from switchgrass directly, with no need for costly chemical and enzymatic treatments.

1 Comment

image: A Lot to Chew On

A Lot to Chew On

By | June 1, 2014

Complex layers of science, policy, and public opinion surround the things we eat and drink.

0 Comments

image: Rusty Waves of Grain

Rusty Waves of Grain

By | June 1, 2014

See how a ruinous fungus that attacks wheat wreaks its damage.

0 Comments

image: Designer Livestock

Designer Livestock

By | June 1, 2014

New technologies will make it easier to manipulate animal genomes, but food products from genetically engineered animals face a long road to market.

3 Comments

image: Putting Up Resistance

Putting Up Resistance

By | June 1, 2014

Will the public swallow science’s best solution to one of the most dangerous wheat pathogens on the planet?

7 Comments

image: Pheromone Factories

Pheromone Factories

By | February 26, 2014

Genetically modified tobacco plants produce pheromones that can trap pests.  

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image: E.U. Pushes Forward With GM Corn

E.U. Pushes Forward With GM Corn

By | February 13, 2014

The European Commission is set to approve a new strain of genetically modified maize despite opposition from member nations.

2 Comments

image: CRISPR for Cures?

CRISPR for Cures?

By | December 5, 2013

Studies in mice and human stem cells demonstrate that the genome-editing technique CRISPR can correct disease-causing mutations.

2 Comments

image: GM Salmon Goes Commercial

GM Salmon Goes Commercial

By | November 26, 2013

Environment Canada allows production of genetically modified salmon eggs at commercial levels.

1 Comment

image: Next Generation: Cells Communicate with Light

Next Generation: Cells Communicate with Light

By | October 20, 2013

Researchers design a clear cellular scaffold called a hydrogel that can be used to detect and transmit light to cells in vivo.

0 Comments

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