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image: Morphine’s Missing Link Found

Morphine’s Missing Link Found

By | June 29, 2015

Researchers identified the last poppy gene product needed to produce morphine in yeast.

2 Comments

image: GM Wheat Fails in the Field

GM Wheat Fails in the Field

By | June 26, 2015

A field trial of wheat genetically engineered to resist aphids fails to measure up to lab tests.

4 Comments

image: Yeast–Made Opioid Progresses

Yeast–Made Opioid Progresses

By | May 19, 2015

Scientists are one step closer to coaxing engineered yeast to produce morphine from a simple sugar.

1 Comment

image: Mouse Mind Control

Mouse Mind Control

By | May 4, 2015

Researchers use chemicals to manipulate the behavior of mice.

1 Comment

image: Call for Germline Editing Moratorium

Call for Germline Editing Moratorium

By | March 13, 2015

In response to speculation that groups have edited the DNA of human embryos, researchers request that gene editing of human reproductive cells be halted.

2 Comments

image: Engineering TB-Resistant Cows

Engineering TB-Resistant Cows

By | March 3, 2015

Scientists add a mouse gene to the cow genome to ward off bovine tuberculosis.

1 Comment

image: Custom Creatures?

Custom Creatures?

By | January 6, 2015

San Francisco-based biotech wants to see its technology applied for inventing new organisms.

0 Comments

image: Week in Review: November 10–14

Week in Review: November 10–14

By | November 14, 2014

Funding for African science; microbiome studies may have contamination worries; mind-controlled gene expression; DNA record keeper

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image: DNA Tape Recorder

DNA Tape Recorder

By | November 13, 2014

Researchers have created a system that edits DNA in response to chemical stimuli or light, allowing bacteria to record environmental events in their genetic material.

1 Comment

image: Modified Yeast Tolerate Alcohol, Heat

Modified Yeast Tolerate Alcohol, Heat

By | October 2, 2014

Simple changes help yeast thrive in the presence of their own harmful byproducts and could boost biofuel production.

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