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image: Top Technical Advances 2015

Top Technical Advances 2015

By | December 24, 2015

The Scientist’s choice of major improvements in imaging, optogenetics, single-cell analyses, and CRISPR

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image: GM Calves Move to University

GM Calves Move to University

By | December 21, 2015

The first two bulls genetically engineered to lack horns arrived at the University of California, Davis, for breeding.

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image: Controlling Synthetic Bacteria

Controlling Synthetic Bacteria

By | December 7, 2015

“Kill switches” ensure that genetically engineered bacteria survive only in certain environmental conditions.

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image: Let’s Talk Human Engineering

Let’s Talk Human Engineering

By | December 3, 2015

Experts continue to discuss the logistics and ethical considerations of editing human genomes at a historic meeting in Washington, DC. 

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image: The Unregulation of Biotech Crops

The Unregulation of Biotech Crops

By | November 25, 2015

Genetic engineering—once a trigger for federal oversight—is now ushering some modified crops around scrutiny.

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image: FDA OKs GM Salmon

FDA OKs GM Salmon

By | November 19, 2015

AquaBounty Technologies’s fast-growing fish is the first genetically modified animal approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.

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image: More CRISPR Proteins Discovered

More CRISPR Proteins Discovered

By | October 23, 2015

Researchers identify three new proteins that may serve as alternatives to Cas9.

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image: Genetically Engineered Dogs

Genetically Engineered Dogs

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers in China delete the myostatin gene in beagles, creating animals with twice the muscle mass.

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image: Opinion: Engineering the Epigenome

Opinion: Engineering the Epigenome

By , , and | August 26, 2015

The use of targetable chromatin modifiers has ushered in a new era of functional epigenomics.

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image: Building Bigger Beefsteaks

Building Bigger Beefsteaks

By | August 1, 2015

Understanding the genetics of stem cell population maintenance in plants producing jumbo tomatoes could help scientists generate more-massive fruits.

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