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image: How a Microbe Resists Its Own Antibiotics

How a Microbe Resists Its Own Antibiotics

By | February 20, 2014

Researchers reveal the molecular mechanisms of Streptomyces platensis’s defense from its own antibiotics, which inhibit fatty acid synthesis in other microbes.

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image: Review: “Please Continue”

Review: “Please Continue”

By | February 11, 2014

A play that dramatizes Stanley Milgram’s infamous social psychology experiments from the 1960s captures the personal side of human research.

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image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch

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image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.

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image: Microbial Smog

Microbial Smog

By | February 3, 2014

Some 1,300 species of microbes, including some associated with allergies and lung disease, are adrift in Beijing’s thick smog.

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image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Buddhist Biology</em>

Book Excerpt from Buddhist Biology

By | February 1, 2014

In Chapter 1, “A Science Sutra,” author David Barash describes how the ancient philosophy might form the perfect link between science and religion.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2014

Me, Myself, and Why, RedDevil 4, Neanderthal Man, and Science from Sight to Insight

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image: Self-Improvement Through the Ages

Self-Improvement Through the Ages

By | February 1, 2014

A 50,000-generation-long experiment shows that bacteria keep getting fitter.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2014

February 2014's selection of notable quotes

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